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JoeyBroths

If you’re writing to desk it will be saved. If not, no. In a normal Linux machine, .bash_history saves your history.


nickbuch

What about passwords saved in KMD (key management daemon)?


JoeyBroths

Idk


McMasilmof

How an application deals with saving stuff is up to the application. Linux has nothing to do with this, if the developers of this KMD have implemented saving changes, it wilö be saved.


theCumCatcher

try it yourself? run an echo command. reboot the pi open a terminal and press the up arrow, is your echo command there? This takes less than a minute to verify yourself, really, my G


madwilliamflint

Same as any other linux box. A Pi's not special. It's just teeny and uses an arm architecture.


nickbuch

thanks for not answering the question


deprovX

You are so ignorant that you can't see the answer. Anyone who has used a computer for even a day knows this. It's 4th standard computer science. Anything that stays on your secondary memory would survive the boots (with some exceptions). Your shell history would be stored in ~/.bash_history most probably (given that you've installed linux and not just *trying* it over a bootable drive or something). And regarding your KMD, RTFM.


JoeyBroths

>thanks for not answering the question With this attitude you’ll never get anywhere. Additionally, no one in the IT/programming community respects someone who asks questions instead of doing simple testing. Even mediocre IT people / programmers learn by trying & not asking. If you don’t change your attitude, everyone, including you, will be better off if you give up on tech and go play video games and watch movies instead.


aelytra

Use the `history` command.