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Travel nurse rant

Travel nurse rant

apocalypseconfetti

It's been a very rough go with travellers this year. 4 years ago, the travellers I met were among the best nurses I've ever met. This last year and a half, about 10% of the travellers are in that group. Agencies are just hiring whomever. We lost a great many staff nurses to travel agencies so they could go make more money, but only one was competent enough to actually travel. It's a terrible system. Paying sub par nurses a premium because of desperation. Thank you for your post and understanding the important role you play. For understanding the flexibility and skill your role as a traveller requires, and for trying to educate a premature and excessively large cohort of travellers. Hopefully, we just start paying staff nurses more to increase retention. I'll hold my breath.


anzapp6588

I think this also has to do with schooling. I think it’s been this way for a while, but it’s gotten especially bad. My program was ONLY geared to passing the NCLEX and not being an actual good nurse. Which sucks. I think the ENTIRE system is extremely flawed.


StarGaurdianBard

Before I took the NCLEX yesrs ago I always wondered how it was possible for there to be so many dumbass nurses out there. Then when I took it I realized its because the NCLEX was the easiest test ever. If someone happens to get themselves into a program that only teaches them how to pass an easy test then they get to come out believing things like the Covid vaccine making them magnetic


anzapp6588

My classmate met a girl who had taken the NCLEX 8 times and still hadn’t passed. Like she might bee a nurse one day. It is BONKERS to me.


beautifultrashpanda

Not a nurse (just a lurking medical social worker) but this is wild to me. For our social work licensing exams we actually have a maximum amount of times we can fail (I believe it's 4) before we aren't allowed any more tries. I'm still wary of social workers who need more than 1-2 tries. 8 times? Yeeesh.


anzapp6588

Yeaaaaa the NCLEX doesn’t have a cap lol. It’s pretty bonkers. You can take it 8 times in a single year. I think some states have rules regarding if you have to go back to school after x amount of attempts. But definitely not all states. Everyone is different. Say you have to take a second attempt bc you have severe test anxiety. That’s FINE. But 8?! My god like how did this person pass school??? That’s my questions. My program was hard as hell. How did she pass exams?


WishIWasYounger

I had a patient slash himself with a sharp in the psych unit and he was bleeding out and my fellow RN ran up To him with a glucometer to get a FSBS . Yeah


gaykeyyy1

… so what was the blood sugar:)


WishIWasYounger

I made him chart that shit


supertrucker39

I just got my LPN license on a state exemption that only allows me to get a single state license. Passed on the first try with minimum number of questions. Why is there a stupid rule that I can get my license early in my RN program and why wouldn't any other state honor that? Seems awfully dumb. If I have life circumstances to that cause me to drop out I literally have nothing but a restricted single state license. I thought maybe I could do some travelling over the summer, but that idea went away once I realized it was only for this state.


anzapp6588

Wait, your LPN license? I’m confused.


supertrucker39

Yes, board of nursing has a rule you are eligible for LPN license after 1 year of a BSN program. Unfortunately it’s not full LPN legibility because you lose any education if you don’t finish and you cannot use the license if you go to another state. I’m a fully prepared LPN if I am licensed I would think, but I am really not. Why make education difficult for students and why make licenses difficult for those that are eligible?


anzapp6588

Well I’ve been waiting for my RN license for over 2 months now, the boards really do not care at all. I can’t even take my NCLEX yet. I’ve had issues with every single portion of this after graduation. And have had to push back my work start date twice now. It sucks. It comes down to one thing: They. Do. Not. Care.


readbackcorrect

You’re right. As a nursing instructor I got in trouble if I wasn’t “teaching to the NCLEX “. That’s all that mattered. Just get the students to pass the test so that our accreditation is safe and don’t bother about all the rest. This is why I am no longer an instructor.


SearchAtlantis

Not clinical, I do Informatics and EHR related stuff - what do you think differentiates good nurse vs NCLEX prep?


anzapp6588

Like, giving students ample clinical opportunities and allowing them to focus on learning how to be a real nurse instead of insanely difficult exams and tons of busy work. A good nurse is made through experience. Not taking an exam. I’m great at taking exams. I can answer an NCLEX question without knowing any of the content. Does that mean I’ll be a good nurse? Or that I’m good at taking tests? It’s the latter. Imposter syndrome is HUGE in nursing; especially with new grads. And with covid we’re going to be seeing students who only got about half the clinical and lab experience they should have. Which is scary. And NCLEX questions in general are just terrible. The fact that you need to throw out all of your clinical experience to answer questions says something. They always say “don’t answer from your experience!”


littledingusbigbrain

Yeah I'm a covid nursing student (graduating in August) and I have 0 critical care experience, and like a handful of rotations in PCU and LTC. I feel so unprepared.


Silent-Wishbone532

You don’t need critical care clinical experiences to function as an entry level RN. You should, however, have good acute care clinical experiences on a floor.


littledingusbigbrain

Yeah I don't have much acute care experience either.


Silent-Wishbone532

Make sure you get plenty of orientation at your first hospital job. 12 weeks for a floor preferably. Don’t let them pull the 6-8 week bullshit


Greenseaglass22

This year has been awful for nursing students. Our unit just started getting nursing students back. Honestly, your eagerness to learn and desire to be a good nurse and allowing yourself to be guided and educated by senior nurses/preceptors is what is going to lead you to success. If I see my preceptee on her phone, scrolling fb when I'm trying to teach her, game over. I'm done. I can't teach someone who doesn't care.


anzapp6588

I was lucky enough to have 2 preceptor rotations (thank god,) but I know a lot of people who didn’t get that. We were only on medsurg and LTC before that. And my prec. were in PCU and OR. I accepted a job in an OR so that was extremely beneficial, but tons of people didn’t get that opportunity. And are just SOL in terms of real life experience. And we weren’t in an actual lab for over a year. Still had lab. On zoom lol. So we still had to pay for it with zero of the experience.


littledingusbigbrain

> And we weren’t in an actual lab for over a year. Still had lab. On zoom lol. So we still had to pay for it with zero of the experience. Same here :( I really want to work in the ED but I'm not sure how I can get the experience.


anzapp6588

Hey, STILL GO FOR IT. You don’t have to have experience to get hired. See if anyone at your school could set up a day to shadow in an ED. Even just that is great experience. It will be harder if you have never had ED experience, but that’s what being a new grad is for. I recently made a post (it’s in my history,) with interview tips for new grads if you wanna check it out. I used to be an HR recruiter. Apply for anything and everything that catches your interest, regardless of if you feel prepared or not. Because tbh you’re not. I feel like no one is prepared to be a nurse right out of school. But if that’s where your interest lie, go for it!!!


littledingusbigbrain

Thank you :)


HippocraticOffspring

Super scary, most agencies seemed to hire any warm body last year. Tons of people lied about having ICU experience


SelfHigh5

I'm sure you're right, but my god, why would anyone lie about that? So they can be put in a position they are 100% not prepared for? Esp when the expectation is that, as a traveler, you know your stuff without being hand-held.


HippocraticOffspring

For money and clout. Many nurses are bad or dumb people


Greenseaglass22

Wow. That's insane someone would stoop that low. I'm sure it took you less than a shift to figure it out, lol. i would be pissed if someone was taking care of my family member in the ICU who didn't know what they were doing (and didn't have a preceptor or what not).


HippocraticOffspring

Yeah it’s rough. I know someone who was fired from a neuro icu before finishing their new grad training, went to work in hospice for years, then took an ICU assignment in Brooklyn last April


slothurknee

Same. Half the people we had go off to do traveling I thought… really? One girl on her last night refused to take 6 patients when she had been for months and it wasn’t uncommon for us. She kept claiming “it’s her license”. I straight up told her “what do you think you’re going to be doing while traveling?! Because you’re refusing to take 6 that means someone else will likely have 7, what about their license?!”” She just wanted an easy last night.


anzapp6588

Yea, ugh it sucks you have to regularly take 6 patients. That’s not cool for ANY of you working on that unit.


slothurknee

Yeah it started out as “we’re in this shit storm together guys!” To “fuck all y’all but me”


Flowonbyboats

Well I half agree with your comment. While this girl doesn't sound like she might be the most competent, If your state law states that you can take more than x patients If no one caves in on the floor they will have to pull. It's about following protocol. It's unsafe to be spread too thin. She is advocating for the pt without even realizing. The CEO makes millions they have the money to pay another nurse to be within the states ratio laws.


earlyviolet

Cali is still the only state with ratio laws outside ICU. Mass has ratio in ICU only.


SelfHigh5

It's a crying shame, too. It should be like that everywhere.


shmerika00

I'm working in Mass now, NY is my home state. The ratios are so much better here its insane.


Silent-Wishbone532

And they’re not even particularly good in a lot of hospitals- but for the East Coast, Massachusetts is as good as it gets for nursing


slothurknee

Do I think we should have 6 patients? No. But what I’m saying is she was complaining about it on her last night when all of us, day and night shift, had been doing it for months, and still are. Our ideal ratio is 1:5 so it’s an inconvenience but it’s doable. Every other floor was short so I’m not exactly sure where we could pull a nurse from 🤷🏼‍♀️


littledingusbigbrain

>I’m not exactly sure where we could pull a nurse from That's not your job though?


RustyShkleford

This! Half of our ED is now travelers and they range from ok to completely incompetent. Most strike me as nurses who couldn't handle being a staff nurse. Working circles around someone making double or triple what you make is pretty cool.


Big_Iron_Jim

Last november during the height of Covid our travelers refused to care for intubated COVID 1:1 patients, (facility makes them 1:1 when they're proned). Like,that's the whole reason you're here? We also had one get fired and escorted off the property because he'd just straight up give meds without orders or consulting the doc. Like one night he gave his patient a total of 20mg of Ativan because "it looked like they were seizing" when they were intubated on a good dose of propofol, fentanyl, and precedex. Ativan wasn't even ordered.


Willzyx_on_the_moon

Yikes. That person will probably kill someone, if they already haven’t. I know what meds I need in many situations, but I always at minimum get a verbal. We are nurses, not prescribers. Bad nurse.


Big_Iron_Jim

Patient was intubated on prop, fent, and dex is the absurd thing, and had versed ordered, and was RASS goal -4. Like, even if you wanted to be a lazy POS and snow your patient for the night there was a much easier way to do it.


Silent-Wishbone532

Well … if the goal is -4 I wouldn’t call snowing them lazy … that’s kind of the point for that goal


gluteactivation

It is quite possible that that nurse diverted that medication though.


iamcatmeow

That’s just what I was thinking. It’s a weird fucking thing to pull meds when you can just theoretically bolus what is already going in. Nurse is up to something


zeatherz

You sure he wasn’t giving himself the Ativan?


Twovaultss

This. Sounds fucking fishy.


Big_Iron_Jim

I mean, dude was awake and breathing the whole shift. So, I hope his tolerance wasn't that high?


iknitblankets

Could be taking it home though.


StonedGardenGnome

Holy shit he should lose his license.


slothurknee

My eyes got so huge when I read this


Big_Iron_Jim

Yeah my facility reported him to the agency and our state board of nursing. We aren't a compact state so hopefully he will at least be unable to practice in this state again. This agency did not exactly send their best. We also had a gal that would literally do nothing for her patients. Be it tubing changes on IVs, bed baths, CHG baths with central lines, daily weights. You'd have to keep pestering her when the monitor would show bradycardia or something. It once took her 20 minutes to finally go assess when the BP was 80 over something. The A line was all screwed up but come on girl... she'd also wear a fleece at all times, including under her gown in COVID rooms. Gross.


slothurknee

Lol how was she not burning up? I think I may have worked with this same traveler though 🤔 we kept telling her about her covid patient desatting all day and she always had an excuse “they’re eating” “they’re on the phone” while she was on FaceTime or on the internet or watching Netflix. Night shift rolled in and they called a rapid during shift change. Next day she complained to me about how late she was there transferring the patient to icu. I just told her maybe she shoulda did something earlier.


Big_Iron_Jim

Little african american woman from New York with a huge chip on her shoulder because of it (I've been in the shit. This ain't nothing. Y'all ain't shit.) She brought up the race card more than once when we were just trying to help her out. It was a very uncomfortable work environment.


slothurknee

Oh lord. Ours was just a diva from Florida


anYthing_

Probably 2mg to the patient, 18mg to him.


CatsAndShades

How are they getting the Ativan without orders ?????? WTF


Levlove

Probably overriding it from the Pyxis.


Big_Iron_Jim

Overriding the Omnicell on the global patient list. Not hard. We do it as a matter of course if we need an RSI kit or a doc wants a one time paralytic or something. It creates a specific order in Epic that you can link in the MAR with the actual order once the doc puts it in or you do it as a verbal. This guy never did any of that though so the Day nurse logged in and saw 10 overdue ADS OVERRIDE warnings on her MAR and was confused. What was weird is there was only ONE event pulled on the omnicell. So the only thing we could figure is he pulled 10 vials all at once but then kept adding them individually as overrides in Epic. Which is way more work. Guy was weird. He had terrible bedside manner and loved to yell at people too.


ThatOneBeachTowel

Yikes, that’s a fireable offense and needs to be reported to the State Board asap.


[deleted]

You can just enter orders and stick the attendings name on there. They probably won’t sign them though and you’ll get a talking to.


GladiatorBill

Ativan is often able to override because of emergent need during seizures.


jhevi002

Holy shit they should lose their license


sage_moe

Holy shit same thing at my facility! Not 20mg of Ativan but 4mg was given without any actual orders 😬


marye914

Now I’ve done verbal Ativan in the ED before and I’d be lying if I said I didn’t nurse dose sometimes but 20 without even a verbal?? that’s straight negligence and dangerous at best….how did he think he would get away with that?!?


asperges_me_domine

Holy shit she should lose her license.


TronLoot-TrueBeing

I’m sorry but, your facility made intubated proning patients 1:1!?!


chickienuggiez113

Right? Lol


Big_Iron_Jim

Yep. The rationale was that we aren't allowed to put restraints on them while proned because of an increase in pressure injuries. We do lots of things very differently here. We also never started keeping IVs outside the rooms because they didnt want to order extension tubing. Cue running in the room every 30 minutes to change a prop bottle.


Silent-Wishbone532

You really shouldn’t need restraints for proned patients because they should either be well sedated or paralyzed


TronLoot-TrueBeing

Definitely feel you there. Where I work we were/are still 2:1 and sometimes 3:1 with intubated proning patients, keep the pumps in the room as well, and restrain all of them


Silent-Wishbone532

That would be pretty standard pre-pandemic but obviously they weren’t that short staffed 😂


shmerika00

I agree with you. The only time I draw the line is when I'm being handed a situation I feel is unsafe. As a traveler I expect to get the hardest/shittiest assignment but I will absolutely not accept an unsafe assignment. So I wont float to a unit that is outside my specialty or experience if I feel I cannot properly care for those patients. I also will not accept more patients than I can handle. That being said this has only happened one time. When I very nicely explained that it was in everyone's best interest and emphasized patient safety it was resolved. I would not hesitate to leave an assignment that jeopardizes my license or anyone's life. There's too many jobs out there to deal with that BS anyway.


gce7607

Right? On my last assignment they would float MS/Tele nurses to ICU all the time. Glad I never had to do it, but I would refuse since I have absolutely 0 ICU experience


dwarren22387

They were doing this in NJ as well when I traveled there, but they were doing team nursing so 1 ICU nurse and 1 m/s nurse to 4 ICU patients. M/S nurse would pass meds and help out with certain things but ICU would do assessments and titration drips. Definitely not the safest thing, but much safer than sticking 1 ICU nurse with all of those patients!


gce7607

Even that sounds like a better way to do it


shmerika00

Yea I can understand the team nursing, especially during the covid times.


Dramma_Gamma

I'm also a traveling nurse and get paid around the same. I'm a CNA when they want me to be, on a cart to pass meds when they want me to do so. Having said that: I'm an agency nurse. I'll do whatever unit because I know their staff is getting paid $17 or - $26 per hour while I'm over here getting paid much more (I ALWAYS share my salary info if asked because not sharing only benefits the employer). I don't complain, I adapt to whatever unit they put me in. It's hella stressful at times but I KNOW what I signed up for.


titsoutshitsout

See this is what we are for!!! I told another commenter that it’s ok to ask to not work certain units for a it bc you’ve been working them all the time and just need a break. That’s acceptable and I have done it. Also, irrelevant side note, I love taking medicine tech at stations that have them. Nice little break


travelingpenguini

We had a travel nurse do this a few months ago. Refused to float. Refused to work as a tech when needed refused to work as a sitter. Refused to answer call lights. Always saying that's not in my contract for shit that was literally our normal, no extra work or anything. No shitty assignment like some places do. Charge nurses making assignments strategically because she wouldn't check her patients and they didnt want shit getting missed or rapids the next shift. And it made my blood fucking boil. Final straw was she cussed at a patient.....still didn't get cancelled. I got called into the office a few days later for being rude and I was basically like "nope, convo over, if this traveler is still here, you literally can't say shit to me about anything"


kathryn_face

I… I would die to have traveler’s assignment pay being a sitter again


travelingpenguini

For real.....like how the actual fuck are you going to refuse to sit in a room and be making $100 an hour to do so.


wote213

that ego went into their head lol


Cynical_Chameleon

Shit, when I was an intern on a high-needs units at night I was often just filling in for the secretary at $22/hr due to all the differential and bonus pay. You bet your ass I didn't complain--$22/hr to answer phones and call lights that almost never ring because it's night shift? Yes please. I'd sit with a demon for $100/hr.


Detectivemouse

My current contract has assigned me to be a sitter for calm, low acuity, sleeping patients a couple times. It’s a little baffling that they would want me to be a sitter for how much I get paid but I’m sure as shit not going to complain about it.


Mikeymikster

I was a tech for 2 years before being a nurse, I would happily work as a floor tech every night for my RN pay (preferably with incentives, OT, and differentials). I mean depending on the tech I'm working with a lot of time i'm doing my own IO, vitals, and toileting anyways. Take the med pass, family/physician/pharmacy/lab phone calls, and nurse charting away and I'm not gonna complain


Silent-Wishbone532

Honestly, I would have refused to work as a tech - but the more experienced you get as a traveler the less bullshit you’ll tolerate. I was traveling WAY before covid


travelingpenguini

Our own staff do it all the time and if you're the one nurse that wasn't there the night before, you're the one of makes most sense to have it that role. So refusing to do an assignment that any other nurse would have also been expected to do as a traveler is really shitty.


Silent-Wishbone532

I've worked in 16 hospitals and have never been expected to work as a tech. That's a hard no and a goodbye from me.


SoHandsome_3823

Weird, they can argue for different units? I thought after choosing the specialty, that's where they'll work (ICU, ER, Med/Surg). If it ain't specific in the contract (like CVICU vs MICU), it's up to the facility but I've usually seen it specify the type.


titsoutshitsout

I work in nursing homes. It’s usually several units but essentially the exact same work on each unit.


SelfHigh5

Where i used to work, they hired on a bunch of ICU travelers, and they almost *always* were floated to our unit (tele). Like every day. I think I'd be pissed, they didn't seem to outwardly mind. But they had 4 pts instead of 2, no one was intubated, etc. But maybe the money made up for it.


Kyrothes

It gets really fucking old after a while. They do that to me everyday even though I'm contracted in an ICU. But I'm not a traveler im a intown icu resource contractor


Silent-Wishbone532

Some people don’t care. I would have self cancelled in that situation


BallsDeepInRegret

I think they're referring to blanket med surg specialties.


pdmock

I traveled for the 1st time over the summer as an LPN. Some of them complained if they had to work the COVID unit, and like OP said it's why we are here. Not to mention the COVID unit has less patients. Sure they are sicker and you wear a hazmat suit, but the only thing we did extra was some vitamins, a couple IVs and lung assessments.


titsoutshitsout

I always took the Covid unit on my last station. They gave me $5/extra an hour and it was less patients. Win win. I’m an LPN as well


cassafrassious

Omg, yes! I have met some of the saltiest, angriest travel nurses with the biggest chips on their shoulders this past year coming onto our covid unit. Like, I’m here getting paid way less than you because I can’t uproot myself from my family nor can I uproot my family. Not because I am beneath or below you. I stayed on in my own community. I came back to the exact same circle of hell every shift. Do not try to report me to the manager because our patient peed the bed in between report and your initial assessment!* Don’t tell me how you didn’t give any PRNs to the covid positive psych hold because he was scary!** This is OUR job, and you’re getting paid WAY more than me to do it. The least you can do is your fair share! I remember meeting some absolutely incredible travel nurses pre-covid and I sincerely hope that they are doing well and making bank! *my manager full on dismissed that complaint, thank God **without attempting to utilize any resources, such as calling security to assist


titsoutshitsout

My recent favorite: “mr man has been in a lot of pain today. He’s yelling out and stuff.” Me: “did you give him his PRN Percocet?” Them: “..........no”


cinesias

Travel nurses should expect the shittiest parts of the possible assignments, because they're getting paid better than the staff working that same unit. Staff nurses should be sure to help Travel nurses the same as if they are staff nurses, because without Travel nurses, they'd be even more short-staffed.


AshFckinKetchum

Just recently started traveling but honestly I just take the hits as they come. If I really don't feel like I know how to take care of a patient then I'll speak up. Before me, 4 travelers quit because the unit was "too much to handle". But they were also all new. I think there's a mindset going around that just because it isn't your typical unit that you get the easy patients and can lounge around doing whatever you want. Some people are lazy and selfish and probably won't change. We're not all like that. It's just that the bad ones are much easier to spot/hear. Thank you for doing your part and not being a bitch about it - Smith, ASN (don't have/need an alphabet behind my name to feel important lol)


HelmSpicy

My old coworker became a travel nurse and she's good at it, but I wonder if she may be a little bit petty. Obviously she just goes where she is told and does the job assigned to her. Well at a recent assignment wherever my friend was sent to an in-house nurse got bumped from her spot to put my friend there. The in-house nurse was being extremely immature about it the situation, but again, not the travel nurses choice, but was was her choice was to sign on for additional weeks to "try and teach her to behave like an adult". I'm not sure anyone is winning much in this situation.


Ilikesqeakytoys

Let's face facts. Travelers are only in it for the money and nothing more. They get paid alot more than if they were to stay put in their original state. Staffs don't like that because they don't feel their employer is trying hard enough to fill vacancies. Plus no benes have to be paid out so in the long run the employers are the ones making out. Just go in do the work and go away after 16 weeks and no one basically will miss you


MrShankles

I’ll say that I’m in it for the travel too though. No kids, no reason to not explore around the country. I always kinda wanted to do it, but being used as a work mule for no extra compensation during the peaks of the pandemic; that’s what finally pushed me into travel after almost 5 years in my unit. If they would just pay the staff appropriately and keep patients safe, I would still be staff. Now I’m not going back to staff for as long as possible.


anzapp6588

That and people are sick of being treated like shit and having dangerous patient to nurse ratios. Having 7 patients and putting your license on the line and getting paid $25/hr as a floor nurse is a hell of a lot different than having 7 patients and putting your license on the line for $50+/hr.


Silent-Wishbone532

I have to call bullshit on this. Motivations vary - the money is nice (but expenses are way higher and it’s not the windfall people assume - at least not before COVID), but some of us just wanted to travel, have control over our schedules, and see new places


Ilikesqeakytoys

Well known fact! I deal with a ton of travelers and yes some like too travel but most just want to get away from the low paying states they are licensed in. Especially here in California where pay is anywhere from double to triple other drates. Expenses are the travelers responsibility. So not BS you just don't see it like I do


Silent-Wishbone532

I have some experience in this so 🙄. Still bullshit


Ilikesqeakytoys

You really don't keep up on the attitudes that traveler's exhibit. They like to see the world but it still comes down to the Benjamins. That's what my 45 years experience is telling me. You just live in a fantasy world


Silent-Wishbone532

I did it for a long time so - try me, hoe


titsoutshitsout

I mean yea..... money talks. I’m an LPN and I make shit money back home as a staff personnel. I was in debt and I needed to make moves. I do have to disagree that it’s all about money. Like I like to travel and see the country so that’s cool but I also only get to see my family like 2 maybe 3 weeks out of the year. I’m never around for holidays or birthdays or hard moments. I sacrifice a lot to make the money I do. Some legit just like the travel. I recently worked with one traveler who had quit her DON position, grabbed her retired husband, and then set out to see the country. She made less traveling than she did at her DON position. It also helps prevent burn out. Moving around to a new setting really keeps you stay on your toes and you learn different things from all over. I can also teach things I’ve learned to other people. And to be completely honest, the nurses I’ve met who only worked one job for 30years were usually always dumb. Like I had to explain to a 30year RN that the order she just got was a very common ABT...... she chose not believe me and still had to Google it btw. It also looks good on paper to be a traveler. I’ve known people who done it bc it looked better on paper and increased their chances of getting into NP programs and such. Money is a big factor. There are people who solely do it for the money but that’s definitely not the only factor. I wouldn’t do this without the money but I was also drowning in finances


lady_eliza

I definitely do not agree with this. I have been a staff ICU nurse at my facility for 7 years, and after COVID and being treated terribly by our hospital and our administrators, I am about to leave for a travel contract. I just graduated from FNP school, and scheduled to take my boards and move on as a provider, but I want one final time at the bedside (I've been doing teaching and providing support in procedures around the hospital this past year) before I start as a full-time provider. Sure, the money is nice, but I give a damn about my patients and I miss being in the trenches. I just want to do it away from this sinking ship. I think many of us have gotten disheartened in the past year, but I don't think we have all lost our compassion and love for caring.


shmerika00

I'm in it for the experience actually. I've learned a lot the past year traveling. I've been an LPN for 10 years so I've reached the point locally where I've maxed out how far I can go in terms of new experiences. I'm half way through an RN program now but I've learned a lot on travel assignments. The scope of practice varies so much state to state for LPNs.


scoobledooble314159

I made like 3 new friends that were all travel nurses at my old hospital. Everyone misses them and they were so great they convinced me to leave and start traveling :) my reasoning isn't the money though, it's my mental health. If I'm gonna do this job I need an ending in sight and a long no pressure break. No vacation days being denied, BS power point CEs we don't get paid for doing off the clock, and less politics.


titsoutshitsout

I actually have people from each station that I keep in somewhat regular contact with


stinkspiritt

At least in the therapy department when we get approved traveler positions we are relieved because they are filling desperate need that has been there for a long time. And for us sometimes traveler positions open the way for big bosses to approve permanent positions, because they don’t like renewing travel contracts.


RunawayAce

I did the crisis nursing for a little bit and was straight up abused at one hospital so I can understand the nurse refusing. It was awful. It’s one thing to be paid a lot to help and it’s another to get used like that. Deliberate shitty runs in different units every day 6 days a week because you’re paid more. Idk dude I don’t buy the excuse that you should put up with that just because of how much money you make. Some places suck for some people and you have to stick up for yourself sometimes.


titsoutshitsout

I’m know nothing about hospitals so let me put that out there. I work in nursing homes. We have different units but it’s all the same work no matter what unit. The the “hardness” of the units fluctuates. Many people don’t like the one unit she was working. They have a bit more bx but nothing too crazy. And she also doesn’t work it often. Just when she really needs to. She worked or 2 days on the last 2 weeks and she freaking out. That is ridiculous. It’s ok to say “hey, this unit is hitting me hard rn, can I have some days where I don’t work here?” That is acceptable. But to flat out refuse to come to work bc you have to work that unit for 2 days is childish. It also REALLY makes the schedulers hate you.


Echoshot21

I agree about not buying that excuse. I worked one travel assignment (CVICU that was hemorrhaging staff) after working in a CTICU for 4 years. I had a really good understating of that patient population and what to expect in a large institution's CVICU; the assignments they gave me were absolutely fucking horrible. It was like re-living that shift where you had an unsafe double patient assignment that was made because of inadequate staffing every day, for 13 weeks. To make it better I was paid less than the unit's staff AND when they hired 10+ travelers near the end of my contract (because of how short staff they were), those travelers also made more than me.


stephanienich

I couldn’t be a traveler.. I hate change.. y’all are brave


titsoutshitsout

I flourish on it! I like moving around and I feel it helps me from burning out. My current contract is my longest. Been here 9mos but I leave next month. I’m itching to go even tho this has been a good facility to me.


stephanienich

Ugh I just started somewhat new and can’t stand being the new one.. I feel so dumb..


titsoutshitsout

I get that. It’s not for every one


sarisaberry

Honest question: Is there more reasons as to why that certain nurse is bad at her job, or is this merely based on the fact that they're not done with bedtime med pass till midnight or 1 AM? I am wondering what makes them take so long? Is it the patients asking for a bunch of things? Is she taking care of stuff beyond passing meds and comprehensive assessment?


titsoutshitsout

She’s doing what we all have to do. She’s just kinda dumb. Doesn’t retain knowledge. Way over thinks things. Will absolutely refuse to help her CNAs and where we work now, we have 1 nurse and 1 aid on a unit with 30 people for over nights. You have to help them. She asks me the same damn questions every single week.... and stuff that’s really weird to forget at this point. Example, we do med reorders on Monday and Thursday nights. She asks me at least once a week when med order is done and she’s been here 2 months. I’ve shown her how to do very basic paper work way too many times than what’s acceptable. She takes up a lot of other nurse times bc she just can’t remember shit and will not write it down. I’ve also noticed lately there are a lot of missing assessments when she works. Like a lot. The only good thing she has goin for her is that she is sweet to the patients but even they don’t like her bc you’re gonna wait an hour for a Tylenol.


sarisaberry

Oh okay, that makes more sense. Thanks for elaborating... and sorry you have to work with them. :/


titsoutshitsout

Luckily i don’t have too much time exposure to her. She has her unit and I have mine. She only comes over to ask a question. I think she’s been avoiding asking me anything tho bc the last time she asked me if it was a med order day, I was kind of a smart ass.


About7fish

I've developed a serious contempt for travel nurses. It's not personal, I just have the pleasure of watching y'all get away with murder (damn near literally in the case of a patient who was put in respiratory failure by a travel nurse who decided an appropriate dose of ativan for a patient with a prescribed range was \#yolo) while I'm sitting there getting raked over the coals over minor shit that half the time isn't even my fault. Every other goddamn day I'm forced to reconcile an undocumented foley or a catch a wandering patient who didn't have a bed alarm that - lo and behold - a travel nurse had. Meanwhile I'm in a world of shit because I told a needy patient who had kept me in her room for nearly an hour that I had other patients and would have to tend to whatever else she needed after I checked on them. There's just no accountability for anyone but our regular floor staff. Maybe this is just confirmation bias and I'm seeing what I want to see because I'm jealous over the pay discrepency. Maybe this is more a reflection on my hellhole of a unit than anything else. But I can't ignore the encroaching bitterness.


childish_albino_

So you’re mad at the travel nurses because *your managers* treat you poorly? And you think this makes sense? That’s some pretty serious “crabs in a bucket”mentality


About7fish

Pretty much. I don't know if I was a petty dickhead before this fiasco or if I had latent petty dickishness in me all along, but here we are.


Olipyr

Then quit bitching about it, find an agency, find a decent paying contract, find housing in the area that doesn't eat into your bottom line, leave your home and family/pets, take a travel contract, and hope they don't cancel you.


Ok_Move1838

👏👏


tiltedAndNaCly

How do you get into travel nursing? I assume you’d have to get your RN/BSN and work for a certain amount of time before you can travel? And is it suitable for a family and living or are you away from home elsewhere for a long time?


shmerika00

Well it used to be that agencies would only take nurses with a minimum of one year experience in their specialty. Lately I've seen more newer nurses traveling. I think agencies and facilities are desperate to staff. I don't think its a good idea at all. Even one year is not that much experience to be able to roll with it. I did local agency after 3 years and travel only recently. There are actually travel positions all across the healthcare field, CNAs, LPNs, respiratory ect.


tiltedAndNaCly

Gotcha. I applied to the nursing program at my school but I am looking at options within the field. Thanks!


Mkg843

You work for at least a few before traveling. Most people have to quit their staff job to do it (exception is going per diem). Contracts are 13 weeks usually, and while you can try and apply for ones close to home, I don’t think that’s always an option if you need to be working every month. Some people take a few weeks off in between contracts to spend time with family, but the travel nurse gig mostly favors single folk who don’t have to worry about kids and spouses (obviously there are exceptions)


tiltedAndNaCly

Okay that makes sense and was what I was assuming. Which wouldn’t work as I plan to be married in a year or so. I’ll keep an eye out for options that accommodate. Thank you for the help!


Mkg843

No problem. Don’t stress too much. Once you get your first job as an RN, things change so much. Your interests, future plans, feelings towards going back to school, etc. Just focus on graduating and making good grades for now!


tiltedAndNaCly

I first need to make sure I get into the program first haha! But thank you. That’s been my plan thus far but I also am looking at CRNA work but just worry about my chemistry capabilities


titsoutshitsout

I’m an LPN. There are also a lot of travel CNAs. Mostly, i tell people all the time to get at LEAST one year of working before traveling and that’s just for nursing homes. I know I thing about ICU or ER and the like but I would imagine it better to have at least 2 or more years in those types of specialties. We don’t really get oriented and you will drown if you don’t have that experience. There was an influx of agencies allowing travel with new nurse bc I’d Covid which I don’t agree with. I traveled before the Vid tho and any reputable agency will not hire brand new nurses. It’s so unsafe and these young nurse are literally risking their license.


Jbradsen

I’m not a nurse, but I’ve been a been a traveler in the lab as a Medical Laboratory Scientist. I’ve seen some of the other traveler MLSs make large demands and get them. Hours, extra pay, working preferred departments. The thinking is, “This hospital needs me more than I need them.” Actually, I was working as a permanent employee in a lab and became a traveler after I saw how well travelers had it.


GuyInChicago19

All I heard was 2k/week paycheck... You rock by the way! I always try to be welcoming to travelers.


Silly_Protection_221

LPN here for ten years and STNA for 12… for me the biggest issue with new grads from nursing to medical assistants to even STNAs is issues with respect for the profession… respect for your co workers with more experience and respect for physicians and even patients… it’s nuts to me… at times we get wonderful students and most of the time they come in completely oblivious and act like they don’t need to learn or want to learn … I don’t understand it … I grew up with respecting my nurses and co workers and physicians and had a drive to learn and do what’s best for my patients! I feel like Respect and just plain politeness has just left people!


silentbutgold

This entire post is a not so humble brag


Mean_Green_83

I don't really think that is where OP was going with this.


silentbutgold

She definitely got there.😂


[deleted]

Pay is a big part of the issue, though. I don't think OP is out of line.


titsoutshitsout

I wasn’t trying to brag about pay at all. Most of my assignments I don’t even make that much. I was just trying to point out that we are making so much more than the actual staff. The least we could do was let the actual staff have the units they want


[deleted]

Seems fair. My guess is that the other guy is projecting a little.


titsoutshitsout

Eh.... I do be bragging sometimes tho. Not even gonna lie. This is the first time in my life I’ve been financially stable. I’ve got a new truck, I’m about to convert a cargo trailer into camper, I’m putting money on the bank so I can go home and buy land to start a business. I’m making moves. I will also brag that every place I have worked as a traveler has asked me to take a permanent position so I think that says a lot. I also think it’s bc I don’t bitch. Like whatever. You gotta pay me the same and the works the same no matter what unit. I don’t call in and shit. I don’t mind training new people or anything. The only time I annoy management is when it’s for patient advocacy. Some of the floor supervisors don’t like me bc I will go above their heads if they don’t address an issue but that’s few and far between. It also makes upper management like me more bc I actually do my job and try to advocate for the patient. I don’t ignore a problem until I’d bc a big problem. So yea.... I’ll brag. I use to hate myself for a big part of my life. I’m gonna make it known that I’m making it and flourishing and I’m very proud of myself.


[deleted]

If you and the other now-rare travelers who are worth a damn want to puff out your chests a little, that's fine by me. Thanks for not bringing your drama from Florence-knows-where and into my hospital.


RVAEMS399

OP references $2k/week. That doesn't seem like much to brag of, especially if they are 1099. Some of the COVID assignments of $6-10k/week, now that's something else. [https://khn.org/news/highly-paid-traveling-nurses-fill-staffing-shortages-during-covid-pandemic/](https://khn.org/news/highly-paid-traveling-nurses-fill-staffing-shortages-during-covid-pandemic/)


Levlove

OP also said she works in nursing homes, so I think $2000/week is pretty high.


RabidWench

Yeah, for a SNF, that kind of pay is pretty high (at least from what I've heard about regular FT pay). Hell, I've had ICU contracts that paid less.


titsoutshitsout

lol yup. It’s a lot for me but it’s not a lot for many other travelers. Especially RNs


SilentSamizdat

*prospective


titsoutshitsout

I fat fingered it and it auto corrected. Also, this is a comment on Reddit. Not an assigned essay that’s being graded. No one likes a grammar nazi


SilentSamizdat

Didn’t mean to offend, and I know autocorrect is the bane of my existence. Some people just genuinely don’t know the right word and genuinely appreciate a helpful pointer. I know I would, especially as I age and sometimes have to search longer in my brain for the proper vocabulary and grammar.